Budgeting Archives - BUSY01 and First Class Accounts Ovens and Murray

Tag Archives for " Budgeting "

Cost of living

Coping with the skyrocketing cost of living

Coping with the skyrocketing cost of living

Whether it’s refilling your petrol tank or paying at the supermarket checkout, the higher cost of living is hitting every household hard.

Across the world, everyday essentials are surging in price, up 7.2% year on year across the OECD. Unfortunately, experts predict that prices will keep rising for at least the rest of the year.

What can you do to try to keep up with the increasing cost of living?

Here are our 12 top tips

Look for ways to earn more
  • Grow your business’s profitability (talk to us about improving your profits) or ask for a pay rise.
  • Take in a boarder or flatmate.
  • Sell your unwanted items online.
Cut back where you can
  • Prepare more meals at home and spend less at cafés and restaurants.
  • Create a budget and keep your spending under control.
  • Reduce the amount of meat you buy.
Find ways to use your car less.
  • Cancel your credit cards and your buy now pay later accounts.
  • Review all your ongoing expenses like utilities, insurance and subscriptions – cancel, switch providers or get better deals.
Invest in your future
  • Think about investing in ways that are likely to outperform inflation – both shares and the property market have historically provided returns higher than inflation.
  • Start a new business, launch a new product or service, or try a side hustle.
  • Teach yourself about money and finances using free tools online and books from the library. Better money management will help you make the most of what you’ve got.

If prices rise by 7% this year, it won’t be easy to increase your income by the same amount. But if you can increase your income by 5%, then make up the rest through savings, while also investing for the future, you can still come out on top once inflation settles down and prices stabilise.

Worried about budgeting, cash flow or forecasting?

Talk to us. We have years of experience through many economic cycles, including previous periods of high inflation – and we’re always here to help.

Christmas gifts

Christmas gifts for your customers and team

Christmas gifts for your customers and team

Christmas is nearly here, and it’s a great time to let your customers and team members know how much you appreciate them. 

But this has been a tough year. It’s not easy to know how much to spend or whether it’s appropriate to throw a party.

Gifts, cards and donations

The traditional professional Christmas gift tends to be food-related: hams; hampers; bottles of wine or spirits. Those can be ordered online and sent out, although it’s best to avoid anything that will spoil considering current delivery delays and people who may not be working in the office.

For customers or clients who you know really well, something tailored to their personal interests can show you’ve been paying attention. And for both customers and staff, a handwritten card is a lovely touch and costs very little.

Another option is a donation on behalf. Many people really appreciate an email or card that lets them know you’ve donated money to a charity on their behalf, particularly if you can include details like, “The local foodbank will use this donation to feed families on Christmas Day.”

If lockdowns allow, a coffee or lunch for higher value clients is an excellent way to build stronger relationships as well as making the most of the Christmas season. You might spend more this way, but for your best clients this can be far more memorable than a gift.

For your team, a hamper is probably a less popular choice. A Christmas bonus might be appreciated, but do run the numbers first. A supermarket voucher retains its full value, while a cash bonus must be taxed. Talk to your team – they may prefer a paid day off rather than any gift.

How much should you spend?

You might like to create categories based on how much your clients spend with you and how valuable they are to you. The top customers might all receive a larger gift, while the smaller customers might get a something more modest.

Christmas budgeting

Wondering how much each client or customer has spent? Not sure what you can afford to budget for Christmas gifts? We can help.

Get in touch and we’ll run the numbers to give you the insights you need.

Coming out stronger

Coming out stronger

Coming Out Stronger

What does the future look like?

2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic has brought significant challenges for many people, including business owners.

While we are starting to see an easing of restrictions and a return to (Covid) normal the impact of these challenges cannot be underestimated.

While we cannot be sure of what’s ahead, it’s important to be looking forward and planning for your future.
If you're a small business owner, you can become more resilient and in control by applying these few strategies.

Coming Out Stronger Strategies

  • If you have been receiving JobKeeper 1.0, forecast your eligibility for JobKeeper 2.0 and 3.0
  • Prepare and maintain a cashflow forecast with and without JobKeeper
  • Know the key dates where Government support changes, reduces, or ceases
  • Prepare a breakeven analysis for various scenarios
  • Regain perspective by booking a meeting with your bookkeeper 
  • Set a regular review meeting to review and interpret your monthly numbers and key indicators
  • Do a check of your first quarter profits and do a forecast of your future profits to work out if any 2021 tax needs to be set aside
  • Document your future plans for your business - immediate exit, gradual exit, continuation, diversifying
  • If you haven’t already done it, get your 2020 Income tax done or scheduled for completion as soon as possible
  • Review your systems and processes to see where improved efficiencies can be made, especially through the introduction of apps that can reduce paperwork (and the time involved) considerably

If you are seeking advice on business Apps, we specialise in understanding the different options for different industries and businesses. We provide you with insights and guidance on what Apps would best suit your business.

Or, if you're interested in any of these measures contact us to discuss how we can help you become more strategic, resilient, and in control.

The value of cashflow forecasting

The value of cashflow forecasting

During challenging times, many businesses are seeing income either disappear completely or drop to dangerous levels.

To be able to navigate the future path of your cashflow, you need to start forecasting, so you can map out your financial position over the coming months and can take the appropriate action to safeguard your cash position.

Forecasting your future cash piepeline

Projecting your cashflow pipeline forwards during a crisis is vital. Having access to detailed forecasts helps you to scenario-plan, search for cost-savings and look for strategies that will preserve your cashflow position.

Remaining in control of the cash coming into (and going out of) the business is the real focus, so you can accurately predict your financial position and can resolve any issues.

Key ways to get more from your forecasting

Run regular forecasts

The financial landscape is changing on a daily basis at present. A cashflow forecast is not a document that remains static. Variables and external drivers are literally changing each day, so it’s vital that you run frequent forecasts and react swiftly to any projected cash issues as they become apparent.

Use the latest cashflow forecasting apps 

Cashflow forecasting apps, like Futrli, integrate with your Xero accounts, giving a drilled-down view of how your cash inflows and outflows will pan out over the coming months – information that will inform and justify the decisions you make during these extremely challenging times.

Explore the right revenue streams

Most sectors will have seen their face-to-face sales drop to absolute zero since quarantine restrictions came into place. To overcome this, there’s a real imperative to explore revenue streams and new opportunities for income. An example of this is coffee shops that now sell roasted beans online (this will depend on lockdown restrictions). The idea is to find ways to increase the money that’s coming in the door and balance out your unavoidable expenses.

Get proactive with cost-cutting

If you can reduce cash outflows to a minimum, that will have a real impact on the health of your future cashflow. Pare back your operations and aim to reduce things like unnecessary software subscriptions, or over-ordering of basic supplies. Negotiating cheaper rates with suppliers, if possible, will also help.

Review your staffing needs

Now’s not the time to make anyone redundant, but you can look at ways to reduce the costs of staffing and resourcing. Reducing working hours or redeploying staff in different roles are all options that reduce payroll costs, while also looking after your staff’s welfare.

Run a variety of scenarios

Changing the financial drivers in your forecast model allows you to scenario-plan different strategies and options. Many of these will be in a long-term plan when restrictions ease. Scenario-planning lets you answer questions and will give you some hard evidence on which to base your decision-making and strategic outlook over the coming months.

Look at various ways to access funding

If forecasts show a giant cashflow hole coming up, you’re going to need additional funding to get through this crisis. We can assist your business to investigate funding opportunities from grants, banks, loan providers, alternative lenders and crowd-sourcing funders.

Forcasting is an important step to give you the business intelligence to support your decision making.

Talk to us about setting up cashflow forecasting.  Get in touch.

Keeping your cashflow strong in tough times

Keeping your cashflow strong in tough times

Keeping your cashflow strong in tough times

Small businesses are particularly vulnerable in tough economic times.

When sales are slow, there are still overheads and salaries that need to be sorted. Pre-planning and being proactive can help you weather tighter economic periods and allow you to continue to thrive.

Make sure you have a clear picture of your payroll, and any other planned expenses that will need to be accounted for.

If there’s even a possibility that there could be a shortfall, it’s essential to meet this head-on. Whether this means talking to your supplier or creditors to figure out an arrangement, or compromising on other business outgoings, you must make a plan to ensure that the business, or your staff, won’t suffer.

Minimise the stress of cash-flow

Invoice early

Send any invoices that you can, and in advance if possible. Perhaps consider whether you have any regular clients or customers that you could offer a retainer or similar deal to if they book services or make a purchase from you in advance.

Chase payment 

Use this opportunity to chase up any outstanding payments. Strong communication and relationships matter - talk to clients and chase invoices.

Talk to suppliers​​​​​

A little honesty can go a long way. Perhaps they can extend a line of credit for your payments to them. In most cases, a good supplier would rather offer a little flexibility to keep an ongoing business relationship.

Review Inventory

Can you find a cheaper supplier locally to avoid the shipping costs or discuss alternative products that allow you to reduce expenses?

Review your costs

It’s also a good idea to do a general review of expenses. Business costs can creep up, and it’s a great idea to make a time to check on your expenses regularly, no matter what your financial situation. Review all of your regular payments and subscriptions as well as upcoming costs. There may be travel, functions or purchases which you can decide on an alternative approach to.

Talk to the bank or inland revenue

If cashflow is tight, make sure you have conversations early so you have everything in place to see you through.

Need help? We can help you implement strategies to protect your business for the long terms and help you alleviate cashflow worries.  Get in touch.

Teaching your kids about money

Teaching kids about money

Teaching your kids about money is all about finding the right moments to have a conversation. Each time this happens, you’ll be helping to strengthen their financial literacy and build their ability to make good decisions with money.

The money we spend each day tends to be invisible. When was the last time you withdrew your cash for the week and used it to make purchases? Rather than dealing in notes and coins, we tend to reach for our cards or shop seamlessly online. It’s entirely possible to spend money without even reaching for your wallet.

This can give kids some confusing messages about how money is spent. The danger here is that they won’t develop financial literacy and will struggle to manage their own money later on. One way to help them to build their financial management skills is to choose moments to talk to them about money and why you’re making certain decisions.

These moments could include:

Shopping a​​​​t the supermarket

If you’re taking your kids on the weekly shop, get them involved in the process. Involve them in drawing up your shopping list and talk through your budget. Have them help you to find items, and weigh up differently-priced options. As a bonus, helping them to understand how a food budget works might just cut down on all those requests for treats!

Withdrawing money from the ATM 

Getting out money does seem a little magical. So it’s important that kids can make the connection between the money you go to work for, and what they see coming out of the wall. Talk to them about where the money you’re withdrawing will go and help to understand the importance of knowing what’s in your bank account.

Letting them make choices 

When it comes to pocket money or money from a birthday or Christmas, it can be helpful to let your children experience the consequences of their financial decisions. It’s tempting to tell them what to do with their money, but once they discover that they can only spend their precious cash once, take the time to talk with them about what they are feeling and how they might use their money differently in the future.

Choosing activities 

When you choose what to do as a family, don’t forget to talk through the costs of different options. Kids will appreciate balancing an expensive trip to the movies with a free picnic in the park or will be amazed when they compare the cost of an icecream at a parlor versus a whole tub at the supermarket. Encourage them to brainstorm and research low-cost ideas and get creative!